Sacrificing Ego-Self in Judaism and Christianity

(This is the continuation of a series exploring the nature of the human ego in the world’s religions and science, beginning with this post.)

In this post I’ll explore the sacrifice of ego or “self” in the traditions of Judaism and Christianity, and how the transcendence of this “self” led one back to God.

Judaism has a lengthy tradition of sacrifice, of sacrificial offerings made to God, called korban. This traces back to the Israelites and Moses, particularly as outlined in the Book of Leviticus. The most common forms of sacrifice were of animals. It is said that God commanded the Israelites to make sacrifices or “offerings,” on altars designated for that purpose, usually in a sacred place such as the Tabernacle, or Temple. Continue reading “Sacrificing Ego-Self in Judaism and Christianity”

Joseph Smith’s “Sinking” Into the Darkest Abyss to Commune with God

A recent quote I saw shared was from the nondual spiritual teacher Rupert Spira, in which he said this:

…just as the beam of light from a flashlight can be directed towards an object but cannot be directed towards the bulb from which it emanates, so awareness, in the form of attention or mind, can direct the light of its knowing towards objective experience but cannot direct itself towards itself.

Continue reading “Joseph Smith’s “Sinking” Into the Darkest Abyss to Commune with God”

The Book of Mormon as Terma, and Joseph Smith as Tertön

I suggest that the translation of the Book of Mormon was Joseph Smith’s alchemical Magnum Opus, or “Great Work,” a transmutation of his own base desires for materialistic gold and treasure into the highest spiritual realizations of human atonement in God consciousness, and a realization or awakening of eternal life in his Self, even theosis, which he continued to preach for the rest of his life. His revelation of the Book of Mormon is similar to the ancient Buddhist tradition of tertöns who reveal terma texts through inner mystical union. Continue reading “The Book of Mormon as Terma, and Joseph Smith as Tertön”